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Care to expand your vocabulary?

February 22, 2009

colporteur (noun) – a peddler of religious books

I’m working on reading my first (and probably only) Mark Twain novel. “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court.”

It’s not bad…it’s just such a challenge to read that it makes it sort unenjoyable. I feel like I need a few years of heavy vocab study just to be able to get through it.

I have found it much easier to soldier through if I read it out loud though…it even made me laugh a couple of times today.

Why’d I have to go and try to read a classic? I’m really more of a trashy romance kind of gal…or suspense thrillers…or romantic suspense thrillers…haha

~T the D

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. The Ripley Porch permalink
    February 23, 2009 2:17 pm

    Twain's works are simplistic…although I think he always tossed in odd words to force folks to pay attention to what they were reading.If you are going toward the classics…to "refine" yourself…I would suggest similar type books. Steinbeck's Cannery Row & Tortilla Flat are better choices. Toss in Heller's Catch-22 for a sarcasm dose (ten times better than the movie).

  2. T the D permalink
    February 23, 2009 2:25 pm

    Thanks for the suggestions 🙂 Catch-22 has been on my reading list for a while, but I added the Steinbeck novels. I’ll become well-rounded reader yet! I’m seriously dying with this Twain novel…I “get it” aside from some of the crazy vocab he threw in…I guess I just don’t like his style much. But if I stop reading it now, I’m just a quitter…so I have to finish!~T the D

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